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Research

This area is intended to feature aspects of on-going research, published to stimulate discussion and contributions from others who may be interested.
Items will be added as they become available and the information within the various topics may be updated occasionally as new information emerges.

Comments and/or contributions to the articles will always be welcome.

The Transferware Patterns of William Smith & Co. (Dick Henrywood)

William Smith operated the Stafford Pottery at Stockton-on-Tees in Yorkshire from c.1825 to 1855. The firm produced large quantities of transfer-printed ware and had a significant market across the North Sea in Belgium, Holland and Germany. The output was wide-ranging but teawares seem to have predominated. They were quite prolific in the introduction of new patterns over the years, many of which were marked with a title and/or a pattern number. No pattern book is known to have survived, so a list of pattern numbers has been assembled from surviving examples (click here).

Numbered Transferware Patterns of the Goodwin Firms (Dick Henrywood)

The history of the Goodwin firms of Longton in Staffordshire is complex and the partnership names changed frequently. The factory produced a range of transferware patterns between 1827 and 1851 and at some stage, probably in 1830 or 1831, they started to use pattern numbers which appear in their marks. No pattern book is known to have survived, so a list of pattern numbers is being assembled from surviving examples (click here).

Numbered Transferware Patterns of the Everard Firms (Dick Henrywood)

The history of the Everard firms of Longton in Staffordshire is not straightforward and several partnerships were involved. The factory produced a range of transferware patterns between about 1837 and 1854. They used pattern numbers which appear in their marks and jugs appear to predominate. Again, no pattern book is known to have survived, so a list of pattern numbers is being assembled from surviving examples (click here).

Miscellaneous Numbered Transferware Patterns (Dick Henrywood)

Having examined the pattern numbers used by William Smith & Co. of Stockton, the Goodwin firms of Longton, and the Everard firms, also of Longton, my mind drifted on to other wares known with marks including pattern numbers. No single firm appeared to use a consistent numbering scheme, but a variety of numbered wares are found and examples could help in grouping some together, eventually leading to possible attributions. This is not remotely a comprehensive list and there must be many more to be recorded. (click here).

The Mayers of Longport – Relief-Moulded Jugs Design Numbers (Dick Henrywood)

Some of the manufacturers of relief-moulded jugs also numbered their wares. Thomas, John & Jos Mayer were not especially prolific, but they did make several interesting designs which are noted for their quality. This is not a comprehensive list and there must be more to be recorded. (click here).

Minton of Stoke – Relief-Moulded Wares Design Numbers (Dick Henrywood)

The famous Minton firm of Stoke produced a wide range of relief-moulded jugs and related wares and used a numbering system which covered most of them. A prelimiary list of such numbers has been assembled but it must be emphasized that the numbers run to more than 500 and there is much information not currently known. This list is very much a work in progress and changes will be incorporated as new information becomes available. It is also intended to add images although that will take time. Contributions of new or amended information and (particularly) good images would be very welcome. This is emphatically not a comprehensive list and there must be more numbers to be recorded. (click here).

Potential research contributions, related to transferware, jugs or other pottery subjects would always be welcome. Please email:

recorder@transferprintedpottery.com